Product Reviews

Inlaid Stonehenge Table

Craftsman Peter Danko’s dining or conference table is the most handsome example of a slab-top design that we have seen. The allusion to Stonehenge is well taken: there is a classical monumentality to the piece. Each table is handmade and custom built of walnut, oak, ash, and cherry. An inlay of maple or exotic wood is used around the edges of the top to add decorative interest. There are three models available, ranging in width from 72″ to 144″; all are 29″ in height. Illustrated is the smallest table. The largest makes use of two 72″ slabs.

Peter Danko Associates sells through architects, designers, and to the public through its showroom.

Catalogue of Contemporary Design, Main Street Press

Stacking Chair

Curtis Erpelding’s handsome three-legged stacking chairs put to shame all the flimsy, ungainly models found in social halls and cafeterias from coast to coast. They even look good when they are stacked. The frames are ash and the seats leather. The chairs can be disassembled quite easily if necessary. Erpelding, who developed the design with the help of a National Endowment for the Arts grant, explains that he designs for the “individual who wants elegant yet practical furniture solutions for modern living with its mobility and smaller living spaces.” Thank you, craftsman Erpelding, and thank you, NEA. Some of Erpelding’s designs, including this chair, are produced by him on a limited production basis; others are strictly one-of-a-kind commissions. In either case, he invites your inquiries. Information available in the form of photographs, drawings, and estimates.

Catalogue of Contemporary Design, Main Street Press

Kenneth Lynch & Sons

This firm cannot be surpassed in the field of architectural ornamentation. Working in wrought iron, bronze, brass, steel, cast stone, and other metals, Lynch fabricates imposing gates, grilles, stair rails, monuments, and garden ornaments which are used throughout the world. The firm works with architects and designers to create lushly ornate and expertly crafted architectural decoration. If your project is large enough to interest this firm, you can be sure the results will be worth it.

Fourth Old House Catalogue, Main Street Press

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This was an online toy store and one of the very first. They asked for product descriptions that were narrative, friendly, and, when possible, in the first person. In this case, it was a true-ish story.

Title: Sleuth Scope

[Aisle copy] Your kids can scope it all out without being seen

[Summary Description] This extendable periscope from Wild Planet is bound to pique your kids’ curiosity. It extends up to two feet with an advanced lens system of 4x magnification and easy-to-use manual focus.

[Age Range] 4and up

[Product Description] We had an unusual experience at our house this spring. A pair of cardinals built a nest in a tall rhododendron bush right outside our window. But, by the time the kids would pull chairs over to watch the progress the adult birds would see them and fly away in fear. The Sleuth Scope caused a collective family brainstorm. By staying below the windowsill and raising the extendable periscope, the kids could watch the cardinals’ progress to their heart’s content. We’re pleased to report that, from nest-building, to egg-laying, to hatching, and—the biggest thrill of all, watching the parents feed the babies, the kids were eye-witnesses to it all. And now that the babies are flown and spring moves into summer, they’ve put the Sleuth Scope to many more uses. Hint to parents: bring it the next time you go to a baseball game– your littlest ones will finally be able to see over the crowd.

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